Cameras
 

The Future of Photography

Posted August 18, 2017
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August 19th is World Photo Day. Photography, and video as an outgrowth of that, have come a long way since the first cameras in the 19th century. Video, even more so, has drastically changed, particularly in the last 10 years with the introduction of small digital cameras and smartphones capable of capturing high definition photos and videos.

This change in technology has caused a change in the way that we produce and consume video around the world and particularly on the Internet. What was once an industry dominated by only a few major players has now completely opened up for anyone to partake in.

The people over at COOPH on YouTube have put together this video to show us the possible future of photography (and therefore video) and highlight some very cool new technologies and concepts.

 


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