What Does The ATT/Time Warner Merger Mean For Us - the video makers?

Posted June 15, 2018
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Today, the Time/Warner - ATT merger is going through.

At the same time, Comcast is bidding for Fox.

The world of media is fast changing.

Conventional broadcasters and cable networks are dead meat.

Just this week, Lisa and I cut the cable. We were a big anxious as first, but as it turns out, we are now faced with much better content, much easier to access, and of course, we can see it whenever we want it.

Once you cut the cable, the idea of going back to linear, appointment watching TV seems crazy. And while we may have lost 2,000 channels, 99% of which we never watched, we have suddenly gained acces to the world.

Where else can you tune into Gardener's World or Countryfile any time you want and watch whatever eipisode you want to see.

So cable is dead

And so is broadcast

But what does this mean for us, the video maker?

How do we make a living and build a career in this very new world?

 

First of a continuing series of videos on the topic.  

 


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